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Miscellaneous / Other »  Aeronca 7AC Champ
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Aeronca

 Country: United States

 Industry/ Capability:
General aviation aircraft, Commercial and Defense Industry contracts

 Head Office:
Aeronca, Incorporated
Middletown, Ohio


 Noteworthy:
Aeronca Model K Scout
Aeronca Model 7 Champion
Aeronca Model 11 Chief

Aeronca E-107 engine
Aeronca E-113 engine ...
* partial list



In 1937 Aeronca's factory was destroyed, a decision was made to move the operation to Middletown, Ohio.
ever since, all of the aircraft produced from the start of production in 1929 to 1937 are known as the "Lunken" Aeroncas.


 Additional Notes:

1941: Aeronca introduced the L-3 Grasshopper, it was used in training many of the WWII pilots.

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Aeronca 7AC Champ

following the end of WWII, Aeronca returned to civilian production


When it comes to picking their favorite post-war trainer, most folks fall into line behind one of two airplanes: The Cub or the Champ.
— the little Champ is the only classic of the period to give the Cub a run for its money in the learning-to-fly game.

This is a real blueprint, expertly restored from original plans and vintage design drawings. — measuring a generous 42"x 30".

Aeronca 7AC Champion
When it comes to picking their favorite post-war trainer, most folks fall into line behind one of two airplanes: The Cub or the Champ.

All will admit that the little Aeronca Champ is the only classic of the period to give the Cub a run for its money in ...   continues: Click here


Hover Over Image to Enlarge  
aeronca-champ-c.jpg aeronca-champ-b.jpg aeronca-champ-a.jpg

Formally changing its name to Aeronca Aircraft Corporation in 1941… the onset of WWII ushered in a new era for Aeronca aircraft.


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Customers who bought the Aeronca 7AC Champ also purchased:

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History and Description: Aeronca 7AC Champ...
Aeronca 7AC Champ

This is a real blueprint, expertly restored from original plans and vintage design drawings. — measuring a generous 42"x 30".

Aeronca 7AC Champion
When it comes to picking their favorite post-war trainer, most folks fall into line behind one of two airplanes: The Cub or the Champ.

All will admit that the little Aeronca Champ is the only classic of the period to give the Cub a run for its money in... continues below

Continued from above…    its money in the learning-to-fly game. The first lines for the new airplane, the Model 7 Champion, were laid on vellum early in 1944 and the airplane flew in May of that year. The official designation of the airplane was 7AC (Model 7, first variation, Champion) and it used the A-65 Continental.

"Built by Aeronca Aircraft Corporation, the Champ first flew in 1944, having been designed in tandem with the 11AC Chief, the Champ with tandem seating and joystick controls, and the Chief with side-by-side seating and yoke controls. The intention was to simplify production and control costs by building a pair of aircraft with a significant number of parts in common; in fact, the two designs share between 70% and 80% of their parts. The tail surfaces, wings, landing gear, and firewall forward? engine, most accessories, and cowling? are common to both airplanes."

"Selling for $2,095, the Champ outsold the Chief by an 8 to 1 margin. Engine upgrades in 1948 and 1949 resulted in the Models 7DC and 7EC. Between 1945 and 1950, Aeronca was producing 50 light aircraft per day and by the time production ended in 1951, the company had sold more than 10,000 Champions.

By Debs McCaffrey