| 
 | 
Free Shipping on Orders $100.00 and Up - Get it Delivered on us
WWII (RAF) Great Britain »  Bristol Beaufighter
Shipping  |  Cart Contents  |  Checkout   

Bristol Aeroplane Company

 Country: Great Britain

 Industry/ Capability:
One of the first and one of the most important British aviation companies, designing and manufacturing both airframes and aircraft engines.

 Head Office:
Filton, England, UK

 Noteworthy:
Bristol Scout
Type 105 Bulldog
Type 152 Beaufort
Type 156 Beaufighter
INSTL: Hawker Fury
INSTL: Hawker Tempest
INSTL: Hawker Sea Fury ...
* partial list


Much of the preliminary work which lead to the Concorde was carried out by the company.


 Additional Notes:

During WWII Bristol’s most important aircraft was the Beaufighter multirole aircraft, a long-range fighter, night fighter, ground attack aircraft and torpedo bomber.

Top Categories
JET Fighters
Warbird Engines
WWI Fighters
• WWII (RAF) Great Britain
WWII (USAAF) United States
WWII Empire of Japan
WWII German Luftwaffe
WWII Italian Air Force
WWII USSR Soviet Russia
Miscellaneous / Other
Armor - Tanks ...

Information
Aviation technology, freedom
Quality - Value and Service
About Blueprinting
Quick & Easy - Sign In

Bristol Beaufighter

the first radar equipped nightfighter


The Bristol Hercules engines were amongst the quietest in use at the period, especially when compared to the loud roar made by the Rolls Royce Merlin…
—and the Beaufighter could use its low level speed to make sudden surprise attacks against Japanese supply depots in the Burmese jungle, then disappear as quickly as it came.

This is a real blueprint, expertly restored from original plans and vintage design drawings. — measuring a generous 42"x 30".

The Beaufighter was a British heavy long-range fighter used during WWII. Equipped with superior firepower and speed, it was highly successful in fights with the Germans. It was also used against the Japanese who named it the "whispering death" because of the speed at which it could suddenly strike, then turn for home… in addition, the Beau used the Bristol Hercules ...   continues: Click here


Hover Over Image to Enlarge  
ww2_bristol-beaufighter-c.jpg ww2_bristol-beaufighter-b.jpg ww2_bristol-beaufighter-a.jpg

Known as the "Whispering Death" by the Japanese… the 'Beau' was instrumental in driving the Japanese from South East Asia…
—and in the defeat of the Luftwaffe's night bombing offensive.

 
Blueprints... did you know?

Options (if any)
Size:
Everyday low Price: $32.00
— choose quantity below
Quantity:

& also purchased,  you might like…

Customers who bought the Bristol Beaufighter also purchased:

Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress
Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress
Bristol Centaurus radial engine
Bristol Centaurus radial engine
Lockheed P-38 Lightning
Lockheed P-38 Lightning
History and Description: Bristol Beaufighter...
Bristol Beaufighter

This is a real blueprint, expertly restored from original plans and vintage design drawings. — measuring a generous 42"x 30".

The Beaufighter was a British heavy long-range fighter used during WWII. Equipped with superior firepower and speed, it was highly successful in fights with the Germans. It was also used against the Japanese who named it the "whispering death" because of the speed at which it could suddenly strike, then turn for home… in addition, the Beau used the Bristol Hercules... continues below

Continued from above…   the Bristol Hercules sleeve-valve engines, which were much quieter than the norm. The Bristol Beaufighter was one of the most significant British aircraft of the middle years of the Second World War.

As one of the most versatile aircraft to serve with the Royal Air Force during World War II. It served in many vital roles in varying climates. It served as a radar equipped night fighter, day fighter, coastal and shipping strikes with both torpedo and rockets

The Beaufighter was a long-range heavy fighter modification of the Bristol Airplane Company's earlier Beaufort torpedo bomber design. Unlike the Beaufort, the Beaufighter had a long career and served in almost all theatres of war, first as a night fighter, then as a strike fighter, and eventually replaced the Beaufort as a torpedo bomber.

To speed up production many parts of the older Bristol Beaufort were used. The tail, landing gear and wings of the Beaufort were transplanted to the Beaufighter and most units were equipped with airborne radar located in the nose for night-fighting.

The Bristol Beaufighter was the second generation of aircraft to be developed from the earlier Bristol Blenheim. First came the Bristol Beaufort torpedo bomber, a larger, heavier aircraft than the Blenheim, but very obviously based on its predecessor. The Beaufighter was then developed from the Beaufort (thus the derivation of the name ? from the Beaufort Fighter).

Fact File:

Bristol Beaufighter

The 'Whispering Death'

The Bristol Beaufighter two-seat fighter prototype first flew in July 1939 and the Mark I entered squadron service with the Royal Air Force in September 1940. A development of the Bristol Beaufort torpedo-bomber, it proved to be a most versatile and successful aircraft. Originally employed in November 1940 as night-fighters in the United Kingdom and fitted with AI (Airborne Interception) equipment, Beaufighters I-F had appeared in North Africa by 1941 as day-fighters.

Axis shipping in the Mediterranean was soon to feel the Beaufighter's firepower and it soon proved its versatility by being adapted as a torpedo-bomber to carry one 18-inch (457-mm) torpedo in the 1C version. The formidable armament of the Mark 1 consisted of four 20-mm cannon in the nose and four .303-inch (7.7-mm) machine-guns in the starboard and two in the port wings.

No theatres of war were without the Beaufighter. It flew in India, the Mediterranean, in the Pacific where its near-silent approach led to the Japanese naming it 'Whispering Death'. In Europe it flew intruder missions. In Italy the United States Army Air Force used it as a night fighter. The RAF's Coastal Command and the Royal Navy's Fleet Air Arm operated the aircraft, and the Royal Australian and New Zealand Air Forces flew it, the latter fitting .50-inch (12.7-mm) cannon.

Powered by two Bristol Hercules XI 1,670 hp (1,215 kw) radials giving it a speed of 303 mph (480 kph), the Mark I was followed by the Mark II in 1941 which had twin Merlin XX 1,280 hp (954 kw) engines to enable the production of Hercules engines to be directed to increase Stirling bomber production. Other major Marks of the Beaufighter were the VI rocket-firing version with a Vickers K machine-gun in the dorsal turret used mainly in the Far East, and the Mark X torpedo- and rocket-attack aircraft with eight rocket projectiles and two 250 1b (113 kg) bombs. The X also carried the distinctive AI nose thimble and dorsal tail fin. A total of 5,662 Beaufighters had been produced by September 1945.

Specifications of the Mark VI:

Span: 17.6 m (57 ft 10 in) Length: 12.7 m (41 ft 8 in) Gross weight: 9,797 kg (21,600 lbs) Range: 2,382 km (1,480 miles) Ceiling: 8,077 m (26,500 ft).

Debs McCaffrey