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Fokker

 Country: First factory in 1912 - in Germany, moving to the Netherlands in 1919.

 Industry/ Capability:
In the 1920s, Fokker became the world's largest aircraft manufacturer.

 Head Office:
1912: Fokker erected two aircraft factories in Germany, one in Johannisthal (near Berlin) & one in Schwerin.
1919: Fokker relocates & builds factories in Amsterdam & Veere.
1922: Fokker also builds three factories in the United States.


 Noteworthy:
Fokker Dr.I triplane
Fokker D.VII
Fokker E-V/D-VIII ...
* partial list


Fokker was named after its founder, Anthony Fokker.


 Additional Notes:

Fokker aircraft have played a significant role in the history of aviation. Innovative designs and construction techniques kept Fokker companies at the forefront of aircraft design and manufacture for nearly ninety years.

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Fokker EV/ D.VIII

The last fighter type built by Antony Fokker


The Fokker D.VIII was a rare monoplane design of WWI and regarded as one of the best fighters of the German Empire in the conflict. Providing a blend of survivability, firepower and adaptability.
— the Fokker D.VIII series also set a bit of history of its own when it became the last fighter in all of WWI to record an enemy air kill.

This is a real blueprint, expertly restored from original plans and vintage design drawings. — measuring a generous 42"x 30".

The Fokker E.V was the last fighter type built by Antony Fokker for the German Fliegertruppe during WWI. The aircraft was a plywood-covered, fully cantilevered parasol wing configuration.
The E.V was just in time for the Second Fighter Competition (July 1918). The Plane was regarded as the best of the rotary - engined competitors. Production started immediately, and in July the first ...   continues: Click here


Hover Over Image to Enlarge  
ww1_fokker-d_viii-c.jpg ww1_fokker-d_viii-b.jpg ww1_fokker-d_viii-a.jpg

This aircraft was specially designed by the Fokker company for the Second Fighter Competition.
The pilot sat in an open-air cockpit behind a windscreen aft of the wing assembly which was fitted ahead and above his position…

 
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History and Description: Fokker EV/ D.VIII...
Fokker EV/ D.VIII

This is a real blueprint, expertly restored from original plans and vintage design drawings. — measuring a generous 42"x 30".

The Fokker E.V was the last fighter type built by Antony Fokker for the German Fliegertruppe during WWI. The aircraft was a plywood-covered, fully cantilevered parasol wing configuration.
The E.V was just in time for the Second Fighter Competition (July 1918). The Plane was regarded as the best of the rotary - engined competitors. Production started immediately, and in July the first... continues below

Continued from above…   July the first production planes were delivered to the Front. The performance was impressive and pilots nicknamed the plane the "Flying Razor".



Right:
The Fokker D.VIII has the distinction of recording the last air kill in the First World War and was often referred to as 'The Flying Razor' by the Allies.

Anthony Fokker ended the War as he started, with a monoplane design. Unlike his earlier 1916 Fokker E-III "Eindekker?, this one had a cantilever wing and had no external bracing wires. It combined survivability, firepower and adaptability in a sturdy airframe.


The E.V (Eindecker - single wing, model V) aka D.VIII, was developed in response to a fighter competition held in mid-1918. The aircraft was nicknamed the ?Razor?, due to its head-on profile. This final version was regarded as one of the best fighters produced by the Germans during the First World War. The design was unusual and many aircraft were divided among the eventual victors for further study after the war. Perhaps the main item of importance that came from the development of this airplane was the Fokker all-wood cantilever wing, which was used on all his successful postwar designs.
 


Left: Fokker D.VIII in Dutch markings
The Fokker E.V was the last production fighter of the German Air Service in 1918. It had a troubled start with the problem being traced to poor workmanship in the wing manufacturing shops of the Fokker subsidiary. When gussets and webs were installed correctly, the plywood covered wing of the E.V met and exceeded required specifications.

Redesignated as the D.VIII, ( some late examples still labeled as E.V) the type soldiered on even after the end of World War One. It was fleshing out infant air forces in other countries, outwardly they were indistinguishable except by their stenciled serial numbers. In 1918 it was the cutting edge.

Fact File:

Fokker D.VIII/E.V

The Fokker E.V was the last production fighter of the German Air Service in 1918

The Fokker E.V was the last fighter type built by Antony Fokker for the German Fliegertruppe during WWI. The aircraft was a plywood-covered, fully cantilevered parasol wing configuration.
The E.V was just in time for the Second Fighter Competition (July 1918). The Plane was regarded as the best of the rotary - engined competitors. Production started immediately, and in July the first production planes were delivered to the Front. The performance was impressive and pilots nicknamed the plane the "Flying Razor". But after two flying accidents on August 16 and 19, when a wing failed in flight, the type was immediately grounded for investigation. Production was stopped, and all previously made E.V's were returned to the Fokker factory.
The wing structure was strengthened, and workers were more careful with assembly procedures.

The aircraft returned to the front during October as the "Fokker D.VIII". The letter D, which used only for biplanes, indicated that the new wing was twice as strong. But the D.VIII came to late, because the war was ending. Only one victory, achieved by a pilot flying the E.V, had been confirmed; the victory awarded to Emil Rolff from Jasta 6 on August 17.

The myth that Fokker smuggled train-loads of aircraft out of Germany, has reached epic proportions. While we know that this was true to some extent, we must try to understand what was happening. First, we know that Germany was out of the aircraft purchasing market after November 11, 1918. It is known that of 335 that were ordered, 289 Fokker E.V/D.VIII had been delivered by 8 Oct.1918. Pending contracts could not be paid for, so the post war German government was more than willing to let Fokker leave with his rolling stock of D.VII, D.VIII and C.I types (some of these having been accepted by the German government were among those spirited away).

It's military service continuing after the end of WWI. Eight (four from other sources) E.V's from the Polish Air Forces flew against Russian and Ukrainian forces in 1919. One of these planes was captured by the Red Army and used by the Soviet's until the mid 1920's.
Some planes reached Holland, Italy, Japan, the USA, and England as trophies, in total all the E.V's/D.VIII's were scrapped in accordance with conditions set forth in the Armistice.

The allied commission was busy destroying aircraft in the field. New aircraft at air parks ready for disbursement went to the allied countries as war reparations (mostly Fokker D.VII and Roland D.VIb types). At least twenty incomplete Fokker D.VIII type airframes were destroyed at the Fokker factory in Schwerin. A further twenty-six complete Fokker E.V/ D.VIII types went to Holland and were sold off by the Fokker company there. Recipients were the Dutch Luchtvaart Afdeling , Polish Air Service and The United States.

D-VIII EQUIPPED WITH 110 H.P. OBERURSEL ENGINE.
OFFICIAL PERFORMANCE TEST-SUMMARY OF RESULTS

May 20, 1921 - Airplane: Fokker Monoplane
No.: P-165
Type: D-VIII
Engine: 110 H.P. Oberursel
Propeller: Axial 01476
Equipped as: Alert type
Weight empty (including water): 848 pounds
Armament and equipment: 74 pounds
Crew: 180 pounds
Gasoline: 113 pounds
Oil: 23 pounds
Weight loaded: 1,238 pounds
Weight per square foot: 11.45 (108 square feet)
Weight per horsepower: 9 (137 H.P. at 1,390 R.P.M.)

DIMENSIONS

Over-all span: 27 feet 7 inches
Over-all length: 19 feet 4 inches
Over-all height: 8 feet 6 inches
At rest: 5 feet 8 1/2 inches
Chord: 4 feet 11 inches
Area with ailerons: 108 square feet
Arrangement: On trailing edge of wing
Upper length: 5 feet 2 1/8 inches
Upper chord: 10 3/8 inches
Distance from center of ailerons to longitudinal axis of airplane: 10 feet 3 1/2 inches
STABILIZER: Setting: 3.5 deg positive

Debs McCaffrey