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Grumman

 Country: United States

 Industry/ Capability:
Aircraft; aircraft parts and equipment.

 Head Office:
Grumman Aircraft Corporation
Bethpage, New York


 Noteworthy:
F4F Wildcat
F6F Hellcat
TBF Avenger
F8F Bearcat
F-14 Tomcat ...
* partial list


Grumman's aircraft were considered so reliable and ruggedly built that the company was often referred to as the Grumman Iron Works.

1943: Grumman introduces the F6F Hellcat; Hellcat pilots account for 55 percent of all enemy aircraft destroyed by the Navy and Marines.


 Additional Notes:

The Grumman F4F Wildcat was US fleet's primary air defense during the Battles of Coral Sea and Midway.

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Grumman F6F Hellcat

had the highest Kill/Loss ratio of any American fighter plane


Although less agile than the Zero, it was tougher and better armed. Not only were Hellcats more powerful, they were more numerous.
— far superior to the leading Japanese combat planes, including the Mitsubishi A6M Reisen, the Zero.

Historically accurate Military F6F Hellcat blueprint
Developed on 42"x 30" uncut master sheet
Real blueprint, developed direct from a vellum master
Navy's dominant fighter in the second part of WWII
Unit cost in 1944: US $35,600

Grumman F6F Hellcat

Successor to the Grumman Wildcat, the F6F Hellcat made history in 1942 when it decisively whipped the Japanese carrier based fighters opposing it in the Pacific during World War 2. First Flown on July 26th of ...   continues: Click here


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ww2_grumman_f6f_hellcat-a.jpg ww2_grumman_f6f_hellcat-b.jpg ww2_grumman_f6f_hellcat-c.jpg

The Hellcat went into combat early fall of 1943… with first major action in a raid against Rabaul harbor on New Britain on November 5 1943. From that time on, it was a major player in Pacific naval campaigns.

 
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History and Description: Grumman F6F Hellcat...
Grumman F6F Hellcat
Historically accurate Military F6F Hellcat blueprint
Developed on 42"x 30" uncut master sheet
Real blueprint, developed direct from a vellum master
Navy's dominant fighter in the second part of WWII
Unit cost in 1944: US $35,600

Grumman F6F Hellcat

Successor to the Grumman Wildcat, the F6F Hellcat made history in 1942 when it decisively whipped the Japanese carrier based fighters opposing it in the Pacific during World War 2. First Flown on July 26th of... continues below

Continued from above…   July 26th of that year, the Hellcat was the result of specifications laid down by a large group of fighter pilots polled by the officials of the Grumman Aircraft Company. In addition to its duty as a carrier-based fighter, the Hellcat served with the U.S. Marine Corps as a potent fighter-bomber.

It was powered by a Pratt and Whitney R2800-10. double wasp, 18 cylinder dual row radial engine, producing 2000 Hp. The fighter was armed with six wing mounted Browning .50cal. machine guns.

The American Grumman F6F Hellcat fighter from the same stable of the Grumman "Iron Works," shared a heritage with the earlier F4F Wildcat, but was a completely new design sharing only a family resemblance to the Wildcat. Some wags tagged it as "Wildcat's big brother" . The Hellcat and the Vought F4U Corsair were the primary United States Navy carrier fighters in the second half of World War II. The Hellcat proved to be the most successful aircraft in naval history, destroying 5,163 aircraft in service with the US Navy and US Marine Corps, plus 52 with the Royal Navy's Fleet Air Arm during World War II. After the end of World War II, the Hellcat aircraft was rapidly phased out of frontline service, finally retiring in 1954 as a night-fighter in composite squadrons.

Fact File:

Grumman F6F Hellcat carrier-based fighter

Designed as a replacement for the obsolescent F4F Wildcat, the Hellcat reached operational units early in 1943 and made its combat debut in a raid on Marcus Island on August 31, 1943 during the Gilbert Islands campaign. The Hellcat provided Navy pilots for the first time in the war with a fighter that was superior in most respects to the agile Japanese Zero. Flying from the fast carrier forces that ranged the Pacific in 1944, Hellcat pilots broke the back of Japanese air resistance to the U.S. island-hopping campaign.

On June 19, 1944, the Japanese made a supreme effort to smash the carriers of Task Force 58 which were supporting U.S. landings in the Marianas. In what later became famous as "The Marianas Turkey Shoot," Hellcat pilots gunned down 366 of the 545 enemy aircraft sighted that day. On February 1, 1945, during one of the Navy's first large-scale raids on Tokyo, Hellcats of Air Group 80 set a new Navy record by destroying seventy-one defending Japanese fighters for the loss of three Hellcats.

Perhaps the most lethal use made of the Hellcat was the "mowing machine", devised by Lieutenant Eugene A. Valencia, the Navy's third-ranking ace of the war. The mowing machine was a flight of four Hellcats with one fighter always on the attack while the other three covered from behind and above. On April 17, 1945 Valencia and his flight put the idea into action during a strike at targets in Kyushu. Fourteen Japanese aircraft were shot down. On May 4, the mowing machine accounted for eleven Japanese planes near Okinawa and ten more on May 11. Living up to its appropriate name, the Hellcat destroyed a total of over 5,000 enemy aircraft during the war.

Debs McCaffrey